Oh, That Temper!


My Dear Son,

You certainly have a temper going there, hey. You just have to have your way. And I just have to find a way of gently throwing that temper out the window. Your Mama (maternal granny) says you get your stubbornness from me. Your Daadi (paternal granny) says she could see your feisty temper way back when you were admitted to the hospital. You were very temperamental then already, yes. Very impatient too, even with the nurses. You would scream at them if they took a second too long to cup feed you. You would throw the cup out of their hands when you became frustrated. One sister in particular called you ‘little old man’. She tried real hard to help us get you to latch, but you would just scream whenever you got near my breasts. Her last attempt kind of worked though. And I think this somewhat initiated the process of you eventually latching. She inserted into your mouth a syringe or pipe with expressed breast milk, while simultaneously getting you to latch. Alhamdulilah, now you can’t get enough of breast milk (just as your Daadi predicted) so much so that I had to train you to not sleep on the breasts. Sometimes you still get your way.

May that temper vanish into your toddler years. Ameen.

With love,
Mommy

Our Brave Little Soldier


My Dear Son,

I had a little time to go down memory lane today.

I was thinking about the time you were admitted to hospital four days after you were born. You were born on a Thursday around 1:00 a.m. The hospital discharged us later that afternoon. The Monday we had to go in for a check-up and that’s when my fear became reality. They admitted you because you were underweight, dehydrated and not latching. I cried. Your daddy was not in town at the time. He was working hard in Oman, trying to secure a good life for you. I felt that I had failed you, as I watched you lay in the hospital cot, so helpless, so quiet. Just before then you were screaming. The stern nurse had said it sounded like a hungry cry. As I watched you, I recited to you, with tears in my eyes, relieved for the silence, yet worried and panicky at the same time. How helpless I felt. The nurse said it would just be a day or two that you’d have to stay at the hospital. It went on to more than that, and more and more, until a week. Your daddy became very worried and had to end his work contract to come home and see you for the first time. The doctors were trying to find out exactly why you had lost so much weight and why your yellow jaundice level was decreasing so slowly. They couldn’t find anything, and you were still not latching, but not screaming as much at the breast (so we were getting there, I knew it). Eventually, they discharged you with follow-up visits and tests (eye test, brain test, hearing test). Alhamdulilah, the results were always excellent. As the days went, you would sometimes latch slightly. You eventually got the latching perfectly, Alhamdulilah. It only took about a month of persistence. Alhamdulilah, we got through the long days in hospital. You are just proof to the medical world, and everyone else, that not everything can be logically explained. Some things are left entirely to Allah, Most Merciful. Our brave little soldier you are. Alhamdulilah.

With love,
Your Mommy