It’s been so long…


My Dear Son,

It’s been so long since I’ve last written. I barely have the time or energy these days. Much has been happening Alhamdulilah. You are now one week away from 19 months old. You are growing and learning so much Alhamdulilah.

Since the last time I wrote, you’ve been to Makkah and Madinah and thoroughly enjoyed yourself with all the family (Mom’s side and Dad’s side). You went with your father right to the Prophet’s (SAW) grave, Alhamdulilah. We did not take you on any umrahs this time round though as it was very hot and full. We left you with your grandparents, Alhamdulilah. It was so nice to be able to do that.

A few days after saying goodbye to the family in Makkah, we met up again back home in Cape Town. On the flight to Cape Town you were so good mashaAllah. You were the ultimate social butterfly, walking up and down the aisle,  talking and playing with all the people. They all loved your company! 

On one of our flights to Madinah though, it was the complete opposite! Shoo! What a nightmare that flight was! For all of us! You were shouting uncontrollably! We think you were overstimulated from all the sweets people had given you at the airport… Anyway, you seem to be quite the traveler since then, Alhamdulilah. 🙂

In Cape Town, you were quite the showman! You loved all the attention and people around you. You slept better (next to your Daadi) and you ate better too! Alhamdulilah! You definitely are a social boy.

Your three most used words these days are: more (taught by Papa), hot (taught by Daadi) and water (taught by Phoepoe) :). The word ‘more’ you use correctly most times, but ‘hot’ has become any and everything dangerous or bad, like when you knock your head against the wall. The wall then becomes ‘hot’ (I try to then use the opportunity to teach you the word ‘hard’, to no avail). ‘Water’ has become everything you could possibly drink. 🙂

The most recent big recording I have to make is your weaning off the breasts, Alhamdulilah. It didn’t take long. On the morning of 23 August, after breastfeeding you for a long time and still not getting you to sleep, I was exhausted and told your Daddy, today is the day. Your Daddy then tried to put you to sleep, to no avail. You knew what you wanted. You knew we were not giving it to you. You understood well what was happening. I also told you at one stage, “No more milk” and pointed to the breasts. So, the screaming, shouting, kicking and throwing things started and went on whole day basically. The next day wasn’t that bad, you just kept pulling at my tops, trying to get to what you wanted. Now and again you would vent out again. Nap times were the worst. You were only allowed one feeding a day, it was just before bed. I would breastfeed you to sleep. And that was it. Even if you woke in the night, which you still do, you just got cow’s milk from your sippy cup (now just water). After four days of just one night feeding every night, I replaced that with milk, sometimes Pediasure. You were absolutely fine. I think at this point you were  over the whole milk deal. 🙂 Three days and nights went by with absolutely no milk and I thought this must be it. And it was! Alhamdulilah. Took you about four days (and a lot of dua!) to say bye-bye to about one and a half years of attachment. Alhamdulilah! 🙂

Now, the next challenge awaits us as you take off your pants, stick your hands in your nappy, pull at your nappy, take off your nappy… Aaaaah! Drives me crazy! Your Dad has started putting you on the toilet once every night just before your bath.

The other thing we’re slowly conquering is you being able to be on your own for short periods, like when I need the bathroom. Before, I was never able to close the door because you would then shout and cry hysterically. Now, we are slowly getting there. I’m just letting you cry a bit sometimes. Earlier though, you were so determined that you managed to open the door on your own! I didn’t even know you could reach! So now I have to lock the door.

Besides reaching door handles though, you are able to stand on your little chair and open your room’s door with ease (something your Dad taught you). You’re also giving me a hard time as you grab anything you can think of to use as a step to get you places you can’t yet reach, like Mom and Dad’s bed.

You are becoming a big little boy now, Alhamdulilah. Moreso because you are going to be a big brother soon inshaAllah. Yes, we will soon welcome a new little bundle to our family. Ameen. And you will be showing your sister or brother all the tricks. 😉

With love,

Mommy

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Separation Anxiety


My Dear Son,

It’s been a while since I last wrote, much has happened though. We are now living in Arabia, Alhamdulilah. Daddy, you and I.

Daadi, Mama, Papa and your aunties and uncles are all missing you back home, wondering if you are missing them too. I don’t know if you are. I don’t know if you realise that we have moved, that we are in a different place, that there are people missing from your everyday. You seem to be adapting well though, Alhamdulilah. You are also sleeping more peacefully, Alhamdulilah. You are developing well, MashaAllah.

37 weeks old. Right now you are refusing to let me put you down. Somehow we’ve landed back to sleeping on the breasts (probably from the time you were sick). You have always hated being alone but these days I can barely put you down before you start crying a heartwrenching cry. Two words come to mind. Separation anxiety? That’s what the ‘experts’ call it. Babies don’t understand the concept of leaving and returning. So, when I leave you, you think I’m never coming back. My dear son, how do I reassure you that, when I leave you, as long as Allah (SWT) wills, I will always return to you, I haste to return to you. What I don’t understand is, each time I come back, does it not help you understand that I will always come back, inshaAllah? But then again, the experts say your memory is incomplete at this stage. So, does that mean you don’t remember me leaving and coming back? Mmmm… Oh, well… I just have to keep reminding myself that this stage too will pass, just like the latching difficulties and the runny popo nappies soiling your good clothes after nearly every feed. Just as those phases have passed, this will as well. Ameen. May it be sooner rather than later. Ameen.

With love,
Mommy

Oh, That Temper!


My Dear Son,

You certainly have a temper going there, hey. You just have to have your way. And I just have to find a way of gently throwing that temper out the window. Your Mama (maternal granny) says you get your stubbornness from me. Your Daadi (paternal granny) says she could see your feisty temper way back when you were admitted to the hospital. You were very temperamental then already, yes. Very impatient too, even with the nurses. You would scream at them if they took a second too long to cup feed you. You would throw the cup out of their hands when you became frustrated. One sister in particular called you ‘little old man’. She tried real hard to help us get you to latch, but you would just scream whenever you got near my breasts. Her last attempt kind of worked though. And I think this somewhat initiated the process of you eventually latching. She inserted into your mouth a syringe or pipe with expressed breast milk, while simultaneously getting you to latch. Alhamdulilah, now you can’t get enough of breast milk (just as your Daadi predicted) so much so that I had to train you to not sleep on the breasts. Sometimes you still get your way.

May that temper vanish into your toddler years. Ameen.

With love,
Mommy